History of Prospect Hill

Originally the country of the Peramangk people (Australian Aboriginals of the Adelaide Hills), it was settled as a farming district by English, Scottish and Irish immigrants around the middle of the nineteenth century. The Prospect Hill area boasts a long and fascinating history. This history has been well researched and documented by members of the Prospect Hill Community Association in conjunction with descendants of the first settlers to the area and other such interested parties. Much of this documentation is available for viewing at the Prospect Hill Historical Museum.

  1. Spring Grove, Commemorative Plaque
  2. Methodist Church
  3. Parting Tree
  4. Scout Hall
  5. Old School & World War II Peace Tree
  6. Flag Tree, Commemorative Plaque
  7. Post Office & Museum
  8. War Memorial Hall
  9. Community Centre
  10. Survey Hill, Commemorative Plaque

 

1. Spring Grove, Commemorative Plaque.
The early site of a wattle and daub Wesleyan Chapel built soon after the donation of land by Mr James Morris in 1861.

2. Methodist Church
With the foundation stone for the Prospect Hill Methodist Church originally laid in 1873, the building has since received additions and upgrades, such as the building of a porch in 1882,a vestry in 1913, and the installation of electricity in 1945.

3. Parting Tree
In the early days of the Prospect Hill Methodist Church, it was customary for some members after attending the evening service to accompany each other to this tree before parting and taking their separate ways home. The plaque at this spot records that during 1936 Mrs John Harper planted a flowering gum, replacing the original tree.

4. Scout Hall
Despite there being a scout troop in Prospect Hall since 1944, the group did not have their own hall until 1968. Previous to this, all scout meetings and events were held in the barn and stable adjacent to the Post Office.

5. Old School and World War II Peace Tree
Around 1887 the school teacher at the time, Mrs Elizabeth Spencer, had a house and large classroom built on this site that was enlarged first in 1914 and again in 1940. The World War II Peace Tree was located in the school grounds. The school and tree were burnt to the ground in Ash Wednesday 1983.

6. Flag Tree, Commemorative Plaque
On the hill just north of the Post Office in the Flag Tree reserve stands the butt of an old gum tree, at the base of which is a cairn and plaque commemorating the fact that in the early years a flag pole attached to the top of this tree was, along with a series of such flag poles across the countryside, used to signal the sighting of ships coming into port with immigrants, mail and goods.

7. Post Office and Museum
Originally opened as a Post Office and general store in 1874, this site is now home to the Prospect Hill Museum and Post Office. For more information please visit the museum page.

8. War Memorial Hall
After several years of fund-raising, the War Memorial Hall was opened by Sir Thomas Playford on October 15th, 1960, with the addition of a kitchen in 1970.

9. Community Centre
The Prospect Hill branch of the Country Women’s Association (C.W.A.) was formed in 1947, with the C.W.A. Hall erected in 1949. The original building was destroyed on Ash Wednesday and replaced as a Community Centre. It has since been used for many social functions.

10. Survey Hill, Commemorative Plaque
This triangular-shaped piece of land is south-east of the Post Office and contains approximately one hectare (three acres) of natural scrub. It is a council reserve and has great historical interest for the district. It was from this spot that the first surveys of the area were carried out.