Ellis Cottage & Bakehouse

Ellis Cottage

Using stone quarried locally, the building was originally built by Mr John Stevens (the founder and owner of Steventon Estate, which later became known as Tea Tree Gully) in 1854.

John Stevens acquired Steventon Estate in 1850 but did not reside in the area. He was a pioneer colonist, a miller by trade and used the building as a residence and office mainly at weekends.

The building was later purchased by Richard Ellis and used at various times by members of his family. It was occupied by Claude Ellis and his wife when they were married in 1913. A wood and iron extension complete with stone fireplace of the same size as the stone building helped to accommodate a growing family. The cottage was used intermittently through until the Second World War after which it became a storage area.

The Ellis Cottage is a landmark which reminds us of the days when Tea Tree Gully was a small country town with only hundreds of residents rather than the suburban landscape we know today.
Interview
In April 2001 an interview with Mrs Madge Murphy (nee Ellis) was transcribed. This transcript gives a very good description of life as it was when Ellis Cottage was inhabited.

Rumps Bakery Building

This building was built using stone quarried locally by a Mr Daw a pioneer in the area in approximately 1854 and was originally used as a residence. Charles Rumps reportedly came from Kapunda in 1867, leased the building from Mr Daw and converted it into a bakery to ply his trade.

He employed Ernst Friedrich Heitmann initially as his assistant and later his manager from 1884-1889. Then in 1893 Heitmann purchased the business from Charles Rumps.

The building was eventually sold to Mr Richard Ellis who used it to store chaff and grain for his butcher's shop carthorses. Stables were also built adjoining the present building. In the later twentieth century the building was mainly used as a handy storage area for Dunn's General Store next door.



A view of Ellis Cottage & Bakehouse
From the left:
The Flour Mill, Ellis Cottage, Bakehouse, Dunn's General Store & Highercombe Hotel
Photograph courtesy of Mortlock Library South Australiana Collection

Another view of the Bakehouse
From the left:
The Flour Mill, Bakehouse, Dunn's General Store & Highercombe Hotel
Photograph courtesy of Mortlock Library South Australiana Collection